Welcome to our Electric Vehicle information page.

Here we hope we can give you an insight on the different variants and what they could mean to you financially.

  • The primary difference between a hybrid car and an electric car is that the hybrid car derives some of its power from a conventional gasoline engine. On the other hand, a true electric car gets all of its power from electrical sources, and thereby is a completely non-polluting zero-emission vehicle ( ZEV ).  A hybrid car is a vehicle that utilizes two types of technologies for energy. This usually refers to an automobile that has both a conventional gasoline engine as well as a bank of batteries and that shares the demand for power between these two sources.

 

Hybrid 

These vehicles are can be powered by either engine or battery or both.

Hybrids normally are based on the petrol engine but have the addition of an electric motor, a secondary battery.

Electric range is usually only one or two miles.

They are sometimes referred as Self charging (they don’t need to be plugged in)

 

Plug-in hybrid 

These vehicles are similar to the above but they have a much bigger battery and again like the above Hybrid the vehicles can be driven via engine or battery. They do have the ability to travel further on a charge but on average its around the 30 miles.

They do need charging regularly and this can be done via a power lead.

 

Electric Vehicles

The Electric Vehicle (EV) power is generated solely from a battery.

Mileage is generally the same as above although vehicle efficiencies are improving.

They cost less to run than engine cars but purchase prices are higher. They are, however, exempt from road fund licence tax and congestion charging zones.

 

Fuel cell cars 

If electric vehicles are at the cutting edge of motoring, then hydrogen fuel cells are the razor-sharp tip. A fuel-cell electric vehicle is constantly charged using power from a fuel-cell ‘stack’. This is a box of scientific tricks that takes a fuel (usually hydrogen) and oxygen, and produces electricity from the reaction between them. FCEVs have an exhaust, but the only emission is water.

In theory, the clearest benefit of fuel-cell motoring is that you don’t have to factor in time to charge your vehicle. You drive along, emitting nothing but water, and then when you run out of hydrogen you just pull into a filling station and top up, as quickly as you would with a petrol or diesel car.

But there are some major issues. The first is how ‘clean’ fuel-cell motoring is, because a fair amount of energy is needed to produce the hydrogen, and it’s just as likely to have come from a coal-fired power station as wind or tidal.

 

Do hydrogen cars have a future?

More significant is the relative scarcity of hydrogen refuelling points; despite Government and manufacturer support, there are still only a dozen or so stations in the UK.

 

The Conventional Engine – Internal-combustion

 No electric other than to power the lights, sounds and the on board technology.

Still, a very popular choice.

Information supplied by Auto Express: “ Of the 2.36 million cars registered in 2018, 2.22 million had a petrol or diesel engine.

While local emission zones such as London’s ULEZ  (Ultra Low Emmissions Zone) and national tax policies (diesel company cars sit one band higher than petrol ones) have been contributing to diesel models’ negative press, the fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantage they offer remains as valid as ever. That means they’re something of a default choice, and a sound buy, for drivers who cover above-average distances. Euro 6 diesels are also light-years ahead in terms of their cleanliness compared with older vehicles. Diesels typically have more torque than their petrol counterparts, too, making them better at towing, and ideal motorway companions. Large cars, such as full-size SUV’s, often suit diesel power better.

If you don’t need diesel’s mile-munching, weight-lugging abilities, pick a petrol model; they’re cheaper to buy and escape some of the local and national levies placed on diesel, while the efficiency of petrol engines has improved noticeably over recent years”

 

How it can affect your pocket:

Grants

Low-emission vehicles eligible for a plug-in grant

You do not need to do anything if you want to buy one of these vehicles – tthe grant is automatically applied to the vehice’s price.
The maximum grant available for cars is £3,000.

Vehicles eligible for a grant
The amount of the grant depends on which category the vehicle is in. The 6 categories are:

cars
motorcycles
mopeds
vans
taxis
large vans and trucks

Not all low-emission vehicles will get a grant. Only vehicles that have been approved by the government are eligible for a grant.

For a list of these vehicles please call 01925 212318.

Cars (previously ‘category 1’)
These vehicles have CO2 emissions of less than 50g/km and can travel at least 112km (70 miles) without any emissions at all. To be eligible for the grant, cars must cost less than £50,000. This is the recommended retail price (RRP), and includes VAT and delivery fees. The grant will pay for 35% of the purchase price for these vehicles, up to a maximum of £3,000.

Motorcycles
These vehicles have no CO2 emissions and can travel at least 50km (31 miles) between charges. The grant will pay for 20% of the purchase price for these vehicles, up to a maximum of £1,500.

Mopeds
These vehicles have no CO2 emissions and can travel at least 30km (19 miles) between charges. The grant will pay for 20% of the purchase price for these vehicles, up to a maximum of £1,500.

Vans
These vehicles have CO2 emissions of less than 75g/km and can travel at least 16km (10 miles) without any emissions at all. The grant will pay for 20% of the purchase price for these vehicles, up to a maximum of £7,500.

Large vans and trucks
These vehicles have CO2 emissions of at least 50% less than the equivalent conventional Euro VI vehicle that can carry the same capacity. They can travel at least 16km (10 miles) without any emissions at all. For the first 200 orders the grant will pay for 20% of the purchase price for these vehicles, up to a maximum of £20,000. The grant will then pay for 20% of the purchase price for these vehicles, up to a maximum of £8,000.

Grant for a vehicle charger

You can get up to £350 (including VAT) off the cost of installing a charger at home through the Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme . 

Click through for authorised Installer info